The Most Advanced Piston Aircraft of WWII

 

Built with:

 

 

 

 

 

Nothing functions, sounds, or looks like a

Wings of POWER aircraft

 

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“For those out there that live for realism and depth, Wings of Power aircraft deliver on a scale never seen before. However, even with all this tremendous detail, you can still just throw the throttle forward and fly away…”

 

 

MOVIE:

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Features:

ü       Unprecedented authenticity inside and out

ü       Canopy and pilot seats eject

ü       Built with the very latest Absolute realism” flight technology

o       Can be flown “by the book”

o       Built from actual aircraft tests

o       “Absolute Realism” means the entire flight envelope is modeled via the actual pilot’s training manuals

§         Authentic power characteristics of the supercharged piston engine

§         Realistic cruise performance under various conditions with realistic fuel economy

§         Absolute Realism even delivers authentic “distance-to-altitude” performance under various power settings

§         High engine torque means full power cannot be applied with brakes on or aircraft will “nose over”

ü       Gorgeously constructed aircraft, inside and out, down to the last rivet

o       Oxygen flow and tank gauges

o       “History in a box” with almost every single item historically correct and clickable

o       First authentic reflector gunsight with day and night settings

o       Retractable bulletproof windscreen

o       Extendable ladder

ü       Professionally recorded and mastered engine sounds

o       Latest generation engine sound including realistic prop effects

o       Stall buffet, canopy, ground roll, flaps, gyro, and authentic cockpit wind

o       Special canopy pressurizing and release sounds

ü       Authentic drop tank release actually drops both fuel and weight

ü       Both modern and veteran warbird pilots helped create the “feel” of flight

ü       “Wings of Power “Special Effects” package includes:

o       Historically accurate lighting for stunning nighttime visuals

o       Realistic startup visuals modeled after the real aircraft

o       Belly landings with realistic effects and physics programming

ü       Shockwave’s new standard for high quality manuals

o       Full sized (11” X 8 ½”), 92-page landscape manual with authentic performance and function

o       Absolute Realism Certified Specifications

 

 

 

 

VARIANTS INCLUDED:

 

Heinkel He 219 A-0-R2-G9-FB

 

Heinkel He 219 A-0-R6-G9+FK

 

Heinkel He 219 A-2-R1-G9+HK

 

Heinkel He 219 A-2-R1-G9+TH

 

Heinkel He 219 A5-CZE-LB-79

 

Heinkel He 219 A-7-R2-D5+CL-(RAF)

 

 

 

Screenshots – 800X600 res  (click on any picture to view):

Ultra HIGH-RES screenshots can be found HERE

 

Interior screenshots taken from actual in-game, fully-functional 3D cockpit

    

 

   

 

   

 

    

 

    

 

  

 

 

 

 

WINGS OF POWER CERTIFIED

WINGS OF POWER CERTIFIED

“Absolute Realism”

 

 

The Heinkel He 219 “Owl”

 
History

Heinkel's He 219 Uhu is undoubtedly one of the most advanced aircraft to emerge from World War II.  Conceived solely as a gun platform to serve as a defensive night fighter, the plane featured a bubble-top cockpit that was well forward, affording the pilot superb visibility.  The cockpit was equipped with ejection seats, and was exceptionally well laid out.  All controls were easy to reach and identify.  Combined with the tricycle landing gear, this plane was truly a "pilot's aircraft" and was very easy to fly.  It was stable and predictable, exactly what one would expect from a plane with the Uhu's intended purpose.  The earlier versions were adequately powered by the Daimler-Benz DB 603A, and had good rates of climb and acceptable top speeds approaching 400 mph.  However, later versions of the He 219 were much heavier, and because the more advanced, powerful engines were in short supply, these variants suffered in performance.

 

The He 219 was a superb and lethal gun platform and the later versions packed as many as eight cannon, including the potent 30mm "Schrage Musik" which fired upward into a bomber's belly at an oblique angle.  These accompanied as many as six forward-firing cannon.  The "Uhu" was absolutely devastating to any aircraft that came into range of its guns.  This was accomplished through the use of radar, a new technology.  Ground-based stations would direct the night fighter to the bomber stream, and when in range, the Uhu's radar operator would then take over and guide the pilot to within 100 meters of the target.  The bristling antennae were ugly and added a lot of drag, reducing the aircraft's ultimate top speed substantially.  But without the radar the plane would have been useless at night, and since the Uhu was still about 150 mph faster than the Allied four-engine bombers, this was really not a handicap.  Some of the latest versions were used to track, hunt down, and kill the Mosquito bombers, which were a much more challenging quarry than the lumbering four-engine craft comprising most of the night fighter's prey.

 

In the end, the He 219 fell victim to bad decision-making and was too little, too late.  But it was the most advanced aircraft for its time, signaling the shape of things to come.

 

 

 

Important things to know about your Wings of Power Heinkel He 219 “Owl”

 

FUNCTION                                                                KEY COMMAND    (all except the LADDER can also be clicked via mouse in VC)

Drop External Fuel Tank                                          Shift-D

Retract Armoured Glass                                          O

Revi Gunsight Modes (OFF, NIGHT, DAY)            R

Ladder                                                                        “Wing Fold” key command

Canopy Eject                                                             “Tail Hook” key command

Eject Seats                                                                “Water Rudder” key command

 

 

NOTES:

·        Due to the long canopy open and close times, wait 5 seconds after opening or closing the canopy before operating it again.

·        To eject, you need to first pull the canopy jettison lever, then the large red ejection seat lever on the right.

·        To manually manipulate the prop pitch, move the mouse over the thumb switches on the side of the throttle and use the mouse wheel.

·        Later models are heavier and require more time to get airborne.  These aircraft have more horsepower and a greater top speed, but also suffer from reduced climb performance due to the extra weight. 

·        Make sure the airplane is below the recommended flap and landing gear safe extension speed before deploying flaps or gear

·        Notice the added realism of the animated oxygen gauges.

·        Your aircraft is equipped with realistic fuel loads as well as many other loads including the pilot, guns, ammo, oil tank, oxygen, etc.

·        Use the “i” key for natural engine smoke.  The effect is very subtle but is toggled for your convenience as some like a clean burning engine and others like a little bit of engine smoke.

·        On landing, raise your flaps once you touch down to settle the aircraft, pull back on the stick for additional elevator braking while you use your wheel brakes.

·        Be careful with high-speed dives, as you can lose control of your aircraft if you exceed the maximum allowable speed.

 

 

Wings of Power Heinkel He 219 General Reference

Conversion Factors

You will want to convert from metric to English or American units for convenience.  Following is a list of conversion factors:

 

Weight and Loading

The Wings of Power He 219 is set up with a high level of realism, which extends to aircraft loading and fuel supply.  The normal takeoff CG is about 28.5%.  Read the chart below to determine your approximate center of gravity based on loading and fuel supply.  It is normal for the red index mark on the pitch trim indicator to be several degrees forward of the the rudder and aileron trim indicators when all three are "zeroed".  This is because for a normal takeoff, the trim is set nose-down when the index mark is at zero on the pitch trim indicator.  As fuel is burned off and the CG moves forward, the pitch trim will come further back, until, for landing, it will be several degrees into the nose-up area.  The offset "zero" position serves as a reminder to the pilot that the aircraft is trimmed for takeoff.  The true neutral trim position (for a 25% CG condition) is at +2 degrees, when the red mark is lined up with the other trim indicators when they are at zero.  With ammunition and fuel exhausted, the aircraft's center of gravity is about 24%, and with flaps and gear down on final approach, it may be necessary to use almost the full range of nose-up trim depending on the specific loading of the aircraft.  The general rule is for each 2% of CG shift, 1 degree of trim is required for normal cruising flight or for takeoff.  Thus, if a normal takeoff at 28.5% CG is done at 0 degrees pitch trim, a takeoff at 24.5% would be done at 2 degrees nose-up.  Landing requires more trim because of the drag of the flaps and gear.

At high altitudes, stability will be very poor about the pitch axis, and autopilot performance will be unsatisfactory, if the fuel in the rear tank has not been burned off to move the CG forward.  With 50% of the fuel gone from the rear fuselage tank and the other tanks full, the CG is at about 26.5% with normal payloads.  Stability and handling will be excellent at high altitudes and the autopilot will function properly.

The following Aircraft Performance charts reflects the actual in-game performance of the Wings of Power He 219 A-7.  Compare it to the charts for the real aircraft, taken from the original He 219 manual and you will see it is nearly an exact match.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Absolute Realism means charts like this one from the actual

flight manual are certified Wings of Power performance.

 


 

 

Fuel System

This aircraft has three fuselage tanks.  Each engine can be fed from any of the three tanks via separate fuel selectors adjacent to the throttle quadrant.  Use the mouse to drag the fuel selector to the desired tank.  The fuel gages are on the right side of the cockpit.  Each tank has its own gage.  The rearmost position, indexed in red, is a fuel cutoff position.

 

 

 

Trim

There is a three-axis trim control unit directly behind the throttles.  Note that the "0" position for pitch trim is off center.  This is the takeoff position, which is standardized for a 28.5% CG position.  As fuel burns off, the CG will move forward, requiring the trim control to be moved closer to the center.  See the weight and loading chart for above for exact information on CG changes with fuel load and trim settings for takeoff.

 

 

 


Flaps

The flaps have three basic positions: UP (EIN), START (takeoff), and DOWN (AUS).  Clicking on the START button will automatically move the flaps to the 30 degree takeoff position.  To extend to the landing position, hold the AUS button down until the flaps are fully extended.  The EIN and AUS buttons are momentary switches, so the flaps will stop moving at any intermediate point when the button is released.

 

 

 

Propeller Control and Feathering

The He 219 has switches to manually control or feather the propellers should the need arise.  These are located directly under the flaps controls.  These have three positions: UP, which is normal, constant-speed control; CENTER, which fixes the propeller at the current pitch; and FEATHER, which feathers the propeller.  To feather the prop, first cut the engine by cutting the fuel supply and turning off the magnetos.  Then turn the switch for that engine to the FEATHER position.

 

 

 

OVERVIEW AND SPECIFICATIONS

 

NOTE:

Cockpit and aircraft specifications shown for A-7 variant only (to conserve bandwidth). 

Complete information is included in the aircraft manual included with the airplane.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

General Information - He 219 A-7

The He 219 A-7 depicted here was armed with eight cannon, including two in the dorsal, upward-firing "Schrage Musik" installation.  It was equipped with the FuG 220 Lichtenstein search radar and a rear-warning FuG 220 radar set.


 

 

 

 

 

Weights, Loading, and Trim

The Wings of Power He 219 is set up with a high level of realism, which extends to aircraft loading and fuel supply.  The normal takeoff CG is about 29%.  Pitch trim should be set to about 1 degree nose-down for takeoff.  It is normal for the red index mark on the pitch trim indicator to be several degrees forward of the the rudder and aileron trim indicators when all three are "zeroed".  This is because for a normal takeoff, the trim is set nose-down when the index mark is at zero on the pitch trim indicator.  As fuel is burned off and the CG moves forward, the pitch trim will come further back, until, for landing, it will be several degrees into the nose-up area.  The offset "zero" position serves as a reminder to the pilot that the aircraft is nose-heavy.  The neutral trim position (for a 25% CG condition) is at +2 degrees, when the red mark is lined up with the other trim indicators when they are at zero.  With ammunition and fuel exhausted, the aircraft's center of gravity is about 24%, and with flaps and gear down on final approach, it may be necessary to use almost the full range of nose-up trim depending on the specific loading of the aircraft.

At high altitudes, stability will be very poor about the pitch axis, and autopilot performance will be unsatisfactory, if the fuel in the rear tank has not been burned off to move the CG forward.  With 50% of the fuel gone from the rear fuselage tank and the other tanks full, the CG is at about 26.5% with normal payloads.  Stability and handling will be excellent at high altitudes and the autopilot will function properly.

 

Cockpit Check - Controls (Maximum fuel load, all tanks full)

  1. Parking Brake - Set
  2. Fuel Selector - Set to Position II (center and rear fuselage tanks)
  3. Elevator Trim - 1 degree nose-down (see reference for weight and loading)
  4. Flaps - Takeoff (START) position (30 degrees)
  5. Propeller Control - High speed (12:15 position)
  6. Flight Instruments - Checked and Set
  7. Engine Instruments - Checked
  8. Switches - Checked

Mixture Control

This aircraft is equipped with a fully automatic mixture control.

Engine Starting

  1. Cockpit Check - COMPLETE
  2. Set or hold your parking brakes.
  3. Turn the battery and generator switches to ON.
  4. Put fuel selector in the desired position.
  5. Turn on electric fuel pump.
  6. Turn the Engine 1 magneto switch on BOTH.
  7. Set mixture control to RICH.
  8. Confirm fuel pressure rise.
  9. Engage starter switch until the engine starts.
  10. Check engine instruments to confirm oil pressure rises within 30 seconds.
  11. Idle at 1200 RPM until the oil temperature reaches 40 degrees C.
  12. Check the suction gauge to see if it is working.
  13. Check all instruments for proper function.
  14. After warm-up, idle at 800-1000 RPM.
  15. Repeat for Engine 2.

Pre-takeoff Check

  1. See that the elevator trim tab is properly set - 0 for empty nacelle tanks, +2 degrees if full.
  2. Check the magnetos at 2000 RPM.  100 RPM drop maximum.
  3. Check the propeller control.
  4. Turn the booster pumps ON.
  5. Check flaps are at 30 degrees.
  6. Check the cowl flap position (open for takeoff).

Normal Takeoff

After lining up with the runway, hold the brakes and run the engines up to 2000 RPM.  Hold and confirm power is steady.  Release the brakes and advance the throttles to full takeoff power.  Rotate smoothly at about 200 kph to about eight degrees pitch.  Retract the gear when a positive rate of climb is established and then retract the flaps.  Set engines to climbing power of 1.35 ata and 2500 RPM and climb at 300 kph IAS.  Normal takeoff power is 1.50 ata and 2700 RPM.

High-Performance Takeoff

Use the normal procedure, but rotate at 180 kph IAS to a ten-degree pitch up attitude.  Hold this attitude until the wheels leave the ground, then immediately retract the gear and smoothly rotate to just under 15 degrees pitch.  Hold until obstacles are cleared, then lower the nose to gain normal flying speed and retract the flaps.

After Takeoff

  1. Raise the landing gear.
  2. Raise the wing flaps.
  3. Throttle back to normal climbing power.
  4. Adjust the prop to climbing RPM.
  5. Trim the aircraft as required for climbing.
  6. Adjust cowl flaps as required.
  7. Turn the booster pump to the normal position.
  8. Check all instruments.

Climb Control

A normal climb is made at 300 kph IAS with a manifold pressure of 1.35 ata and the propeller set to 2500 RPM.  A climb to 6,000 meters (19,700 feet) can be accomplished in about 14 minutes and will cover about 43 nautical miles.  Above 8,000 meters, allow the climbing speed to fall off gradually until you are climbing at 250 kph IAS at 11,000 meters.


Cruise Control Schedule

Calculate your fuel consumption and time to your destination using the following table.  The best range is at the highest altitude with the lowest throttle setting.

Altitude

Pilot's IAS (km/hr)

Manifold
Pressure

RPM
(Prop pitch)

TAS (km/hr)

US GPH

Nautical miles per gallon

2100 m

475

1.25

2300 (9:40)

515

245

1.13

6000 m

430

1.25

2300 (9:40)

565

255

1.20

8000 m

400

1.25

2300 (9:40)

596

261

1.23

 

2100 m

410

1.05

2000 (6:00)

450

179

1.35

6000 m

370

1.05

2000 (6:00)

495

186

1.43

8000 m

335

1.05

2000 (6:00)

505

188

1.45

Engine Limitations and Characteristics

The Daimler-Benz DB 603G engine provides adequate performance to reasonably high altitudes.  Engine-out performance is poor on this aircraft at higher weights, especially if an engine fails on takeoff.

ENGINE POWER CHART

TAKEOFF
MAXIMUM

TAKEOFF
NORMAL

WAR
EMERGENCY

MILITARY
POWER

MAXIMUM
CONTINUOUS

NORMAL
CRUISE

ECONOMY
CRUISE

Boost (ata)

1.50

1.50

1.50

1.35

1.25

1.15

1.05

RPM

2700

2700

2700

2500

2300

2200

2000

Full throttle height*

8000 m

8000 m

8000 m

8140 m

8660 m

9210 m

9815 m

*Full throttle height is the height at which full throttle is required to produce the indicated power in the chart.  The power will decline above that height.


Landing

  1. Check tanks and select the fullest tank for landing.
  2. Put the fuel booster on normal.
  3. Set the prop to about 2500 RPM.
  4. Check the traffic pattern and obtain clearance to land.
  5. Slow down to 300 kph and lower the flaps to the first position.  Retrim as needed.
  6. Lower the landing gear, allowing time for full extension (about 10 seconds).
  7. The normal speed in the traffic pattern with wheels down is 250 kph.
  8. Lower the flaps to the second position after turning to your final approach.  Allow sufficient time to reach the full extension, about 10 seconds.
  9. Fly the final approach at about 215 kph, crossing the runway threshold at about 195 kph.
  10. Land the aircraft main wheels first, and let the nose settle gently.  Brake as required.

Flight Characteristics

The Heinkel He 219 is a very stable and predictable aircraft and can be trimmed "hands-off" for any flight regime.  The rate of roll is modest at about 70 degrees per second at optimal cornering speed of 400 kph IAS.  The plane was designed to be a rock-solid gun platform and its behavior reflects that mission.  The maximum G for cornering is 6.0 at a normal combat weight.

Single-Engine Performance

In the event of engine failure, immediately cut the dead engine and feather the propeller (see the reference for details).  Maintain directional control if at low speed and do not allow the airspeed to go below 250 kph IAS if at all possible.  Find a place to land and go there.

Stalls

A stall in the He 219 is extremely gentle and very controllable.  Recovery is completely normal.

Permissible Acrobatics

Acrobatics are verboten.

 

 
REFERENCES

 

Other invaluable assistance was provided by the following people:


CREDITS

 

 

Microsoft

The creators of FS2004.

 

Production

Gentile, Scott

 

Aircraft modeling, panels and gauges

Rogalski, Robert

 

Flight dynamics

SimDynamics Research

 

Visual and sound effects

Gentile, Scott

 

Quality Control

The team

 

Special Thanks to:

Tim Gallagher, John Foust, Ed Knitter, Sean Doran, and Robert Swain.

 

Very special thanks to:

The many WWII air combat veterans who took the time to share their experiences with us, and being so helpful in our quest to create the ultimate re-creation of these aircraft. Thank you to all of our friends and families that stuck by us and worked hard to support us.

 

 

 

 

 

To purchase the

Wings of Power Heinkel He 219 “Owl,”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

               

  

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