Nothing comes close to the sound, function, and feel of this aircraft.

Built with the very latest “Absolute Realism” technology

 

 

 

 

 

“For those out there that live for realism and depth, Wings of Power aircraft deliver on a scale never seen before. However, even with all this tremendous detail, you can still just throw the throttle forward and fly away…”

 

 

Features:

ü       Unprecedented authenticity inside and out

ü       Built with the very latest Absolute realism” flight technology

o       Can be flown “by the book”

o       Built from actual aircraft tests

o       “Absolute Realism” means the entire flight envelope is modeled via the actual pilot’s training manuals

§         Authentic cruise performance under various conditions with realistic fuel economy

§         Absolute Realism even delivers authentic “distance-to-altitude” performance under various power settings

§         High engine torque means full power cannot be applied with brakes on or aircraft will “nose over”

§         Even the plugs will foul if you don’t keep your idle up just like the real P47

ü       Gorgeously constructed aircraft, inside and out, down to the last rivet

ü       Professionally recorded and mastered engine sounds

o       Authentic P47 R-2800 Radial engine sounds captured by Shockwave engineers at all power levels

o       Stall buffet, canopy, ground roll, flaps, gyro, and authentic cockpit wind

ü       Authentic drop tank release actually drops both fuel and weight

ü       Both modern and veteran warbird pilots helped create the “feel” of flight

ü       “Wings of Power “Special Effects” package includes:

o       Historically accurate lighting for stunning nighttime visuals

o       Realistic startup visuals modeled after the real aircraft

o       Belly landings with realistic effects and physics programming

ü       Shockwave’s new standard for high quality manuals

o       Full sized, 84 page landscape manual with authentic performance and function (11” X 8 ½”)

o       Absolute Realism Certified Specifications

 

 

IN GAME MOVIE HERE:

http://www.gamershell.com/news/24409.html

 

 

Screenshots (click on any picture to view):

Interior screenshots taken from actual in-game, fully-functional 3D cockpit

    

 

    

 

    

 

    

 

    

 

    

 

 

 

WINGS OF POWER CERTIFIED

WINGS OF POWER CERTIFIED

“Absolute Realism”

 

 

The P47 "THUNDERBOLT"

 

General Overview

Affectionately known as “The Jug,” the P47 Thunderbolt is as big as the American Spirit.  Ironically the original concept was born in Russia, and can be seen by its rugged and hearty design.  Like a gentle giant, the P47 handles with grace but packs an enormous punch. 

 

When British pilots first saw the P47, it was often mocked due to its size.  The light, maneuverable Spitfire’s could get on a P47’s tail with ease in test trials.  What they didn’t know at that time was the P47 was different type of fighter, and the battles were to be fought at higher altitude where the air is thin, using high-energy tactics.  Both the British and the Germans soon found out, in the right hands, the P47 was lethal.

 

Down low the P47 lumbers along but up high is where it lives and breathes with its high speed and terrific zoom climbs.  A quick burst of the eight browning .50 caliber machine guns is powerful enough to shred a fighter, which was essential for a properly executed “boom and zoom” attack.  .  Being tasked to protect the B17 and B24 heavy bombers up high, and with their ruggedness and power, the P47 performed it’s job with great capability.

 

Built around a massive Pratt & Whitney R-2800 radial engine, The “Jug” was tough, powerful, and fast.  The Wings of Power P47 captures this beauty of the sound, function, and feel of the real P47 like no other.  Like the aircraft, the entire Wings of Power P47 Thunderbolt series is enormous and includes many variants from the Razorback’s to the experimental XP72 prototype.

 

History

The Republic P-47 Thunderbolt holds a unique honor in the ranks of World War II fighters.  This plane was much heavier and bulkier than other fighter planes of its day, outweighing aircraft like the Fw 190 by several thousand pounds.  Equipped with a large, powerful radial engine, it looked as tough as it was.  Known as the "Jug", this aircraft was a mainstay of the Allied fighter fleet and, with its eight .50 caliber guns, was capable of shredding ground targets and airborne opponents alike.  While it could not turn with Axis fighters such as the Fw 190 and Me 109, it could outdive both of these and had a zoom-climb capability that was amazing.  This zoom-climb was used to good advantage; it was said that if a P-47 pilot met an enemy Focke-Wulf at 25,000 feet and wanted to out-climb him to 30,000 feet, the P-47 could dive to 20,000, zoom 30,000, and be waiting for the enemy.

 

The first "Jugs" were fitted with 2,000 HP engines and framed canopies.  Later models such as the D-25 were fitted with bubble canopies and engines of increasing horsepower.  The final production version, the P-47N, had an engine which would produce 2,800 HP with water injection.  The plane's increased weight offset the power to some degree, but the plane was still very fast, with a top speed of nearly 470 mph.  The additional power and strong airframe allowed a lot of ordnance and fuel to be carried, making the P-47N a very long-range fighter that could carry a lot of damage to the enemy.

 

In all, 15,683 Thunderbolts were manufactured, more than any fighter produced during war.

 

 

The P-47M was a special, light-weight "buzz bomb chaser" and had a very high top speed of over 470 miles per hour.  It was assigned exclusively to the 56th Fighter Group.

 

The P-47N was a long-range version made for use in the Pacific Theatre.  It had a much larger fuel capacity, a larger wing, and could carry large drop tanks of up to 300 gallons.  It also had a faster rate of roll due to increased aileron area and "clipped" wings.  It used the same 2,800 HP engine as the P-47M but had a slightly lower top speed because of its heavier weight.

 

The XP-72 “Ultrabolt” was to have been the ultimate P-47.  Equipped with a massively powerful Pratt & Whitney R-4360 engine producing 3,400 HP for combat emergency, this plane could climb over 5,000 fpm and would have reached a top speed of over 500 mph.  It was fitted with a low-drag NACA engine cowling and was fairly light in weight.  The type never saw combat.  Only two were built, one with a four-bladed conventional propeller and the other with twin, contra-rotating, three blade airscrews.  The first was lost in a crash and the second was scrapped around the time of VJ-Day.

 

 

Important things to know about your Wings of Power P47

·        Shift-D releases drop tanks (can be clicked via mouse in VC)

·        Shift-W drops bomb (can be clicked via mouse in VC)

·        Keep the aircraft idling at 800RPM or higher to avoid fouling up the plugs

·        You will need to hold your brakes on to prevent the aircraft from moving at idle due to the torque

·        Do not apply full power with wheel brakes on or the aircraft my nose over, especially the XP72

·        The P47 is a heavy plane that requires a lot of runway to get airborne.  Let the aircraft build plenty of speed before gently lifting off

·        Make sure the airplane is below the recommended flap and landing gear safe extension speed before deploying flaps or gear

·        Realism includes realistic turbo speed light operation and animated oxygen gauges

·        Your aircraft is equipped with realistic fuel loads as well as many other loads including the pilot, guns, ammo, oil tank, oxygen, pyrotechnics, bombs, etc.

·        Use the “i” key for natural engine smoke.  The effect is very subtle but is toggled for your convenience as some like a clean burning engine and others like a little bit of engine smoke.

·        On landing, raise your flaps once you touch down to settle the aircraft, pull back on the stick for additional elevator braking while you use your wheel brakes.

·        Be careful with high-speed dives, as you can lose control of your aircraft if you exceed the maximum allowable speed.

 

Wings of Power P47D20/22 Thunderbolt

 

General Information - P-47D-20/22

Weights and Loading

This aircraft has been set up with a complete array of station loads, including those for pyrotechnics and oxygen.  The CG shift with differing payloads has been closely duplicated and the shift of weight with fuel consumption also duplicates the real aircraft very closely.  By viewing the fuel and payloads menu, you can select what payloads you wish to carry and which ones you want to delete in order to fly at a specific weight.  You can then save your flight with your payload and fuel choices.  For heavier weights, use 15-20 degrees of flaps for takeoff and allow a longer takeoff run.

Aircraft Limitations

Engine Management

The engine will "load up" and foul the spark plugs if it is not kept clear.  Keep your engine idling at 8-900 RPM while on the ground to make sure the cylinders are clean and to assure enough cooling airflow.  If the engine idles below 600 RPM for more than one minute, it will die and will need to be restarted.

Wings of Power P-47D-20/22 Thunderbolt Checklist

Cockpit Check - Fuel Supply and Fuel Management

The P-47D has a fuel capacity of 305 gallons total in two fuselage tanks along with a single 110-gallon drop tank.  Check the fuel selector switch position and the tank contents and make sure the fuel selector is on MAIN for takeoff.  Climb on the main tank for ten minutes, then switch to the auxiliary tank and exhaust the contents (except for a reasonable reserve) before switching back to the main tank for the remainder of the mission.  If drop tanks are fitted, switch to these after reaching 3,000 feet and exhaust these first, then switch to the auxiliary tank, and finally the main tank.  The auxiliary position selects the 100-gallon rear fuselage tank, and the external tanks position causes fuel to be drawn from the centerline drop tank.

Engine Management

The engine will "load up" and foul the spark plugs if it is not kept clear.  Keep your engine idling at 8-900 RPM while on the ground to make sure the cylinders are clean to assure enough cooling airflow.  If the engine idles below 600 RPM for more than one minute, it will die and will need to be restarted.

There is a flashing yellow warning light next to the turbine RPM gauge.  It is normal for this light to flash.  If it glows solidly, reduce throttle to avoid turbine overspeed.

Mixture Control

The real aircraft had an automatic mixture control system which could be placed in either Auto-Rich or Auto-Lean for normal operations.  This flight model also uses automatic mixture control, just as the real aircraft did.  However, the rich/lean options for auto-control cannot be duplicated in FS9, so fuel consumption will be lower than the real aircraft at higher power settings.  The use of manual mixture control cannot compensate for this discrepancy; it is not possible to duplicate the high fuel consumption at rich mixture settings that were experienced by the real aircraft.


Cockpit Check - Controls

  1. Parking Brake - Set
  2. Fuel Selector - Set to MAIN.
  3. Elevator Trim - Neutral
  4. Rudder Trim - 5 degrees nose-right
  5. Aileron Trim - Neutral
  6. Flaps - Up for takeoff (15-20 degrees down for weights over 15,000 lbs.)
  7. Cowl flaps - OPEN FULL
  8. Carburetor Air - Normal
  9. Propeller Control - FULL FORWARD
  10. Tailwheel - unlocked for taxi
  11. Flight Instruments - Checked and Set
  12. Engine Instruments - Checked
  13. Switches - Checked

Engine Starting

  1. Cockpit Check - COMPLETE
  2. Set or hold your parking brakes.
  3. Turn the battery and generator switches to ON.
  4. Put fuel selector on MAIN.
  5. Put the booster pump on EMERGENCY.
  6. Turn the magneto switch on BOTH.
  7. Set mixture control to RICH.
  8. Confirm fuel pressure is at least 10 psi.
  9. Use the primer - three to four shots for a cold engine.
  10. Engage starter switch until the engine starts.
  11. Check engine instruments to confirm oil pressure rises to at least 50 psi within 30 seconds.
  12. Idle at 800-1000 RPM until the oil temperature reaches 40 degrees C. (About three minutes)
  13. Check the suction gage to see if it is working.
  14. Check all instruments for proper function.
  15. After warm-up, idle at 1000 RPM or slightly less.
  16. Idling at less than 600 RPM will cause the engine to load up and it will die after about a minute.

Pre-takeoff Check

  1. See that the trim tabs are properly set.
  2. Check the mags at 2300 RPM.  100 RPM drop maximum.
  3. Check the propeller control.
  4. Turn the booster pump to emergency.
  5. Check ammeter and radios.
  6. Check brakes.

Taxi and Takeoff

The P-47 is a "blind" airplane.  You must S-turn to see ahead of you.  Use the brakes to steer while taxiing, using about 8-900 RPM maximum to taxi at 5-10 mph.

Make certain the runway is clear, then line up in the center.  Close the canopy, lock the tailwheel, and half-close the cowl flaps.  The apply power smoothly to a maximum of 52" of boost with the propeller control full forward.  The P-47 requires a longer takeoff run than other fighters.  You may be tempted to exceed redline in order to build up speed.  Don't do it!  Your plane gets off the ground OK using prescribed power limits - thousands do every day.  Raise the tail about 6" and stay on the ground until reaching about 110 mph.  Then fly the plane off the runway.  The raised tail and increased speed give you better rudder control in case of trouble.

After Takeoff Check

  1. Landing gear - UP
  2. Flaps -UP
  3. Throttle back to normal climbing power.
  4. Adjust the prop to climbing RPM.
  5. Retrim the ship as required for climbing.
  6. Turn the booster pump to the normal position.
  7. Check over all your instruments.

Climb

Develop climbing speed before starting to climb.  Be easy on the back pressure until you have at least 140 mph, then climb gently.  Then reduce your power to climbing power, 42" boost and 2550 RPM.  The minimum climbing speed is 155-160 mph IAS, best climbing speed is 165 mph IAS, which will drop to 155 mph IAS between 10,000 and 15,000 feet.  Above 15,000 feet, climb at 155 mph IAS.  Adjust cowl flaps as needed to cool the cylinders; closed to 1/3 open is about right for climbing.  Above 3,000 feet, switch to drop tanks if they are available.  Otherwise, climb on the main tank for ten minutes and then switch to the auxiliary (reserve) tank.

Climb performance to 25,000 feet (14,500 lbs.)

Manifold Pressure

RPM

Elapsed Time

Distance 

Fuel Used

42"

2550

15.5 minutes

51 miles

40 gallons

 


Cruise Settings

Plan your flight by knowing how much fuel you will need.  The following charts indicate approximate fuel consumption for a range of weights, altitudes, power settings, and speeds.  The bold figures indicate what would be an auto-rich power setting for the real aircraft (not simulated in FS9) and the italicized figures are for auto-lean power settings.  All mixture control is automatic with this flight model, as with the real aircraft.

Cruise Control Schedule (14,000-15,000 lbs.)

Altitude

Pilot's
IAS

Manifold
Pressure

RPM

TAS MPH

GPH

Specific
Range

6,000

216

31

1700

233

68

3.4 mpg

15,000

235

32

2100

290

97

3.0 mpg

25,000

222

31

2150

323

96

3.3 mpg

25,000

248

38

2500

358

126

2.8 mpg

Cruise Control Schedule (16,000-17,000 lbs.)

Altitude

Pilot's
IAS

Manifold
Pressure

RPM

TAS MPH

GPH

Specific
Range

6,000

205

31

1700

222

68

3.2 mpg

15,000

227

32

2100

280

99

2.8 mpg

25,000

212

31

2150

308

98

3.1 mpg

 


Landing

  1. Check tanks and select the fullest interior tank for landing.
  2. Reduce airspeed to 150-200 mph.
  3. Check the mixture control and set to RICH.
  4. Set the engine to about 2550 RPM and 30" of boost.
  5. Close cowl flaps.
  6. Open canopy.
  7. Check gear is down and locked.
  8. Do not make turns below 150 mph IAS.
  9. Begin lowering flaps about halfway around your turn to final approach.
  10. After your flaps are down and you roll out of the turn onto the landing (approach) leg, your speed should be about 125-135 mph IAS.  Don't keep so much power on that you'll be making a power approach.  However, keep enough power on to keep your engine clean.
  11. Just before getting to the runway, break your glide, make a smooth roundout, and approach the runway in a 3-point attitude.
  12. Hold the plane off in the 3-point attitude just barely above the runway until you lose flying speed and the plane sets down.  The P-47 has no tendency to drop a wing but settles rather quickly when you lose flying speed.  So have your plane close to the runway at this point.

Engine Limitations and Characteristics

The turbosupercharged Pratt & Whitney R-2800-series engines are reliable and potent performers.  They can take a lot of battle damage and still make it home.  The P-47D is fitted with a water-injected R-2800-59W which provides 2,300 HP when the water injection switch is enabled.  Emergency power is not required for takeoff.  The turbocharged engine produces power to very high altitudes.

To activate emergency boost, turn the switch on the electrical panel to "AUTO".  The water injection will come on automatically whenever the throttle is advanced beyond 95 percent.  Leave the switch off for takeoff and normal flying.

ENGINE POWER CHART

TAKEOFF
MAXIMUM

TAKEOFF
NORMAL

WAR
EMERGENCY

MILITARY
POWER

MAXIMUM
CONTINUOUS

MAXIMUM
CRUISE

NORMAL
CRUISE

MP

52"

52"

56"

52"

42"

36"

32"

RPM

2700

2700

2700

2700

2550

2550

2250

Flight Characteristics

The Thunderbolt is a heavy aircraft and flies like it.  This is not an airplane you can toss around; control responses are good but not lightning-quick, so a little more planning ahead is needed than with a lightweight fighter.  This is especially true in slow flight and with takeoffs and landings.  However it is quite stable and predictable.

Stalls

Power-off stalls are fairly mild and there is little tendency to drop a wing unless the stick is horsed backward unnecessarily.  With power on, the left wing will tend to drop.  In either case the recovery is straightforward; apply power, push the stick forward, and use the rudders for directional control until flying speed is regained.  With accelerated stalls the procedure is similar unless the stall develops into a spin.

Spins

Never spin the aircraft intentionally even with power off unless you have sufficient altitude to get out of the spin above 10,000 feet.  Never spin the airplane intentionally with the power on under any conditions.  The P-47 does not tend to spin by itself but needs rudder input from the pilot.  However, in a deep accelerated stall a spin may develop.  Recovery is generally very prompt by putting the nose down and applying opposite rudder.  If this does not work, apply power until the spin breaks.

Permissible Acrobatics

All acrobatics are permissible, with the exception of snap rolls and power-on spins.

 


Wings of Power P47D25 Thunderbolt

General Information - P-47D-25

Weights and Loading

This aircraft has been set up with a complete array of station loads, including those for pyrotechnics and oxygen.  The CG shift with differing payloads has been closely duplicated and the shift of weight with fuel consumption also duplicates the real aircraft very closely.  By viewing the fuel and payloads menu, you can select what payloads you wish to carry and which ones you want to delete in order to fly at a specific weight.  You can then save your flight with your payload and fuel choices.  For heavier weights, use 15-20 degrees of flaps for takeoff and allow a longer takeoff run.

Aircraft Limitations


 Cockpit Check - Fuel Supply and Fuel Management

The P-47D has a fuel capacity of 370 gallons total in two fuselage tanks along with two 108-gallon drop tanks.  Check the fuel selector switch position and the tank contents and make sure the fuel selector is on MAIN for takeoff.  Climb on the main tank for ten minutes, then switch to the auxiliary tank and exhaust the contents (except for a reasonable reserve) before switching back to the main tank for the remainder of the mission.  If drop tanks are fitted, switch to these after reaching 3,000 feet and exhaust these first, then switch to the auxiliary tank, and finally the main tank.  The auxiliary position selects the 100-gallon rear fuselage tank, and the external tanks position causes fuel to be drawn from either of the two wing tanks, which can be selected individually using the external tank selector.

Engine Management

The engine will "load up" and foul the spark plugs if it is not kept clear.  Keep your engine idling at 8-900 RPM while on the ground to make sure the cylinders are clean to assure enough cooling airflow.  If the engine idles below 600 RPM for more than one minute, it will die and will need to be restarted.

There is a flashing yellow warning light next to the turbine RPM gauge.  It is normal for this light to flash.  If it glows solidly, reduce throttle to avoid turbine overspeed.

Mixture Control

The real aircraft had an automatic mixture control system which could be placed in either Auto-Rich or Auto-Lean for normal operations.  This flight model also uses automatic mixture control, just as the real aircraft did.  However, the rich/lean options for auto-control cannot be duplicated in FS9, so fuel consumption will be lower than the real aircraft at higher power settings.  The use of manual mixture control cannot compensate for this discrepancy; it is not possible to duplicate the high fuel consumption at rich mixture settings that were experienced by the real aircraft.


Cockpit Check - Controls

  1. Parking Brake - Set
  2. Fuel Selector - Set to MAIN.
  3. Elevator Trim - Neutral
  4. Rudder Trim - 5 degrees nose-right
  5. Aileron Trim - Neutral
  6. Flaps - Up for takeoff (15-20 degrees down for weights over 15,000 lbs.)
  7. Cowl flaps - OPEN FULL
  8. Carburetor Air - Normal
  9. Propeller Control - FULL FORWARD
  10. Tailwheel - unlocked for taxi
  11. Flight Instruments - Checked and Set
  12. Engine Instruments - Checked
  13. Switches - Checked

Engine Starting

  1. Cockpit Check - COMPLETE
  2. Set or hold your parking brakes.
  3. Turn the battery and generator switches to ON.
  4. Put fuel selector on MAIN.
  5. Put the booster pump on EMERGENCY.
  6. Turn the magneto switch on BOTH.
  7. Set mixture control to RICH.
  8. Confirm fuel pressure is at least 10 psi.
  9. Use the primer - three to four shots for a cold engine.
  10. Engage starter switch until the engine starts.
  11. Check engine instruments to confirm oil pressure rises to at least 50 psi within 30 seconds.
  12. Idle at 800-1000 RPM until the oil temperature reaches 40 degrees C. (About three minutes)
  13. Check the suction gage to see if it is working.
  14. Check all instruments for proper function.
  15. After warm-up, idle at 1000 RPM or slightly less.
  16. Idling at less than 600 RPM will cause the engine to load up and it will die after about a minute.

Pre-takeoff Check

  1. See that the trim tabs are properly set.
  2. Check the mags at 2300 RPM.  100 RPM drop maximum.
  3. Check the propeller control.
  4. Turn the booster pump to emergency.
  5. Check ammeter and radios.
  6. Check brakes.

Taxi and Takeoff

The P-47 is a "blind" airplane.  You must S-turn to see ahead of you.  Use the brakes to steer while taxiing, using about 8-900 RPM maximum to taxi at 5-10 mph.

Make certain the runway is clear, then line up in the center.  Close the canopy, lock the tailwheel, and half-close the cowl flaps.  The apply power smoothly to a maximum of 52" of boost with the propeller control full forward.  The P-47 requires a longer takeoff run than other fighters.  You may be tempted to exceed redline in order to build up speed.  Don't do it!  Your plane gets off the ground OK using prescribed power limits - thousands do every day.  Raise the tail about 6" and stay on the ground until reaching about 110 mph.  Then fly the plane off the runway.  The raised tail and increased speed give you better rudder control in case of trouble.

After Takeoff Check

  1. Landing gear - UP
  2. Flaps -UP
  3. Throttle back to normal climbing power.
  4. Adjust the prop to climbing RPM.
  5. Retrim the ship as required for climbing.
  6. Turn the booster pump to the normal position.
  7. Check over all your instruments.

Climb

Develop climbing speed before starting to climb.  Be easy on the back pressure until you have at least 140 mph, then climb gently.  Then reduce your power to climbing power, 42" boost and 2550 RPM.  The minimum climbing speed is 155-160 mph IAS, best climbing speed is 165 mph IAS, which will drop to 155 mph IAS between 10,000 and 15,000 feet.  Above 15,000 feet, climb at 155 mph IAS.  Adjust cowl flaps as needed to cool the cylinders; closed to 1/3 open is about right for climbing.  Above 3,000 feet, switch to drop tanks if they are available.  Otherwise, climb on the main tank for ten minutes and then switch to the auxiliary (reserve) tank.

Climb performance to 25,000 feet (14,500 lbs.)

Manifold Pressure

RPM

Elapsed Time

Distance 

Fuel Used

42"

2550

15.5 minutes

51 miles

40 gallons

Cruise Settings

Plan your flight by knowing how much fuel you will need.  The following charts indicate approximate fuel consumption for a range of weights, altitudes, power settings, and speeds.  The bold figures indicate what would be an auto-rich power setting for the real aircraft (not simulated in FS9) and the italicized figures are for auto-lean power settings.  All mixture control is automatic with this flight model, as with the real aircraft.

Cruise Control Schedule (14,000-15,000 lbs.)

Altitude

Pilot's
IAS

Manifold
Pressure

RPM

TAS MPH

GPH

Specific
Range

6,000

216

31

1700

233

68

3.4 mpg

15,000

235

32

2100

290

97

3.0 mpg

25,000

222

31

2150

323

96

3.3 mpg

25,000

248

38

2500

358

126

2.8 mpg

 


Cruise Control Schedule (16,000-17,000 lbs.)

Altitude

Pilot's
IAS

Manifold
Pressure

RPM

TAS MPH

GPH

Specific
Range

6,000

205

31

1700

222

68

3.2 mpg

15,000

227

32

2100

280

99

2.8 mpg

25,000

212

31

2150

308

98

3.1 mpg

Landing

  1. Check tanks and select the fullest interior tank for landing.
  2. Reduce airspeed to 150-200 mph.
  3. Check the mixture control and set to RICH.
  4. Set the engine to about 2550 RPM and 30" of boost.
  5. Close cowl flaps.
  6. Open canopy.
  7. Check gear is down and locked.
  8. Do not make turns below 150 mph IAS.
  9. Begin lowering flaps about halfway around your turn to final approach.
  10. After your flaps are down and you roll out of the turn onto the landing (approach) leg, your speed should be about 125-135 mph IAS.  Don't keep so much power on that you'll be making a power approach.  However, keep enough power on to keep your engine clean.
  11. Just before getting to the runway, break your glide, make a smooth roundout, and approach the runway in a 3-point attitude.
  12. Hold the plane off in the 3-point attitude just barely above the runway until you lose flying speed and the plane sets down.  The P-47 has no tendency to drop a wing but settles rather quickly when you lose flying speed.  So have your plane close to the runway at this point.

Engine Limitations and Characteristics

The turbosupercharged Pratt & Whitney R-2800-series engines are reliable and potent performers.  They can take a lot of battle damage and still make it home.  The P-47D is fitted with a water-injected R-2800-59W which provides 2,300 HP when the water injection switch is enabled.  Emergency power is not required for takeoff.  The turbocharged engine produces power to very high altitudes.

To activate emergency boost, turn the switch on the electrical panel to "AUTO".  The water injection will come on automatically whenever the throttle is advanced beyond 95 percent.  Leave the switch off for takeoff and normal flying.

ENGINE POWER CHART

TAKEOFF
MAXIMUM

TAKEOFF
NORMAL

WAR
EMERGENCY

MILITARY
POWER

MAXIMUM
CONTINUOUS

MAXIMUM
CRUISE

NORMAL
CRUISE

MP

52"

52"

56"

52"

42"

36"

32"

RPM

2700

2700

2700

2700

2550

2550

2250

Flight Characteristics

The Thunderbolt is a heavy aircraft and flies like it.  This is not an airplane you can toss around; control responses are good but not lightning-quick, so a little more planning ahead is needed than with a lightweight fighter.  This is especially true in slow flight and with takeoffs and landings.  However it is quite stable and predictable.

Stalls

Power-off stalls are fairly mild and there is little tendency to drop a wing unless the stick is horsed backward unnecessarily.  With power on, the left wing will tend to drop.  In either case the recovery is straightforward; apply power, push the stick forward, and use the rudders for directional control until flying speed is regained.  With accelerated stalls the procedure is similar unless the stall develops into a spin.

Spins

Never spin the aircraft intentionally even with power off unless you have sufficient altitude to get out of the spin above 10,000 feet.  Never spin the airplane intentionally with the power on under any conditions.  The P-47 does not tend to spin by itself but needs rudder input from the pilot.  However, in a deep accelerated stall a spin may develop.  Recovery is generally very prompt by putting the nose down and applying opposite rudder.  If this does not work, apply power until the spin breaks.

Permissible Acrobatics

All acrobatics are permissible, with the exception of snap rolls and power-on spins.

 

 

Wings of Power P-47D-30 Thunderbolt

General Information - P-47D-30

Weights and Loading

This aircraft has been set up with a complete array of station loads, including those for pyrotechnics and oxygen.  The CG shift with differing payloads has been closely duplicated and the shift of weight with fuel consumption also duplicates the real aircraft very closely.  By viewing the fuel and payloads menu, you can select what payloads you wish to carry and which ones you want to delete in order to fly at a specific weight.  You can then save your flight with your payload and fuel choices.  For heavier weights, use 15-20 degrees of flaps for takeoff and allow a longer takeoff run.

Aircraft Limitations


Wings of Power P-47D-30 Thunderbolt Checklist

Cockpit Check - Fuel Supply and Fuel Management

The P-47D-30 has a fuel capacity of 370 gallons total in two fuselage tanks along with a single 110-gallon drop tank.  Check the fuel selector switch position and the tank contents and make sure the fuel selector is on MAIN for takeoff.  Climb on the main tank for ten minutes, then switch to the auxiliary tank and exhaust the contents (except for a reasonable reserve) before switching back to the main tank for the remainder of the mission.  If drop tanks are fitted, switch to these after reaching 3,000 feet and exhaust these first, then switch to the auxiliary tank, and finally the main tank.  The auxiliary position selects the 100-gallon rear fuselage tank, and the external tanks position causes fuel to be drawn from the centerline drop tank.

Engine Management

The engine will "load up" and foul the spark plugs if it is not kept clear.  Keep your engine idling at 8-900 RPM while on the ground to make sure the cylinders are clean to assure enough cooling airflow.  If the engine idles below 600 RPM for more than one minute, it will die and will need to be restarted.

There is a flashing yellow warning light next to the turbine RPM gauge.  It is normal for this light to flash.  If it glows solidly, reduce throttle to avoid turbine overspeed.

Mixture Control

The real aircraft had an automatic mixture control system which could be placed in either Auto-Rich or Auto-Lean for normal operations.  This flight model also uses automatic mixture control, just as the real aircraft did.  However, the rich/lean options for auto-control cannot be duplicated in FS9, so fuel consumption will be lower than the real aircraft at higher power settings.  The use of manual mixture control cannot compensate for this discrepancy; it is not possible to duplicate the high fuel consumption at rich mixture settings that were experienced by the real aircraft.


Cockpit Check - Controls

  1. Parking Brake - Set
  2. Fuel Selector - Set to MAIN.
  3. Elevator Trim - Neutral
  4. Rudder Trim - 5 degrees nose-right
  5. Aileron Trim - Neutral
  6. Flaps - Up for takeoff (15-20 degrees down for weights over 15,000 lbs.)
  7. Cowl flaps - OPEN FULL
  8. Carburetor Air - Normal
  9. Propeller Control - FULL FORWARD
  10. Tailwheel - unlocked for taxi
  11. Flight Instruments - Checked and Set
  12. Engine Instruments - Checked
  13. Switches - Checked

Engine Starting

  1. Cockpit Check - COMPLETE
  2. Set or hold your parking brakes.
  3. Turn the battery and generator switches to ON.
  4. Put fuel selector on MAIN.
  5. Put the booster pump on EMERGENCY.
  6. Turn the magneto switch on BOTH.
  7. Set mixture control to RICH.
  8. Confirm fuel pressure is at least 10 psi.
  9. Use the primer - three to four shots for a cold engine.
  10. Engage starter switch until the engine starts.
  11. Check engine instruments to confirm oil pressure rises to at least 50 psi within 30 seconds.
  12. Idle at 800-1000 RPM until the oil temperature reaches 40 degrees C. (About three minutes)
  13. Check the suction gage to see if it is working.
  14. Check all instruments for proper function.
  15. After warm-up, idle at 1000 RPM or slightly less.
  16. Idling at less than 600 RPM will cause the engine to load up and it will die after about a minute.

Pre-takeoff Check

  1. See that the trim tabs are properly set.
  2. Check the mags at 2300 RPM.  100 RPM drop maximum.
  3. Check the propeller control.
  4. Turn the booster pump to emergency.
  5. Check ammeter and radios.
  6. Check brakes.

Taxi and Takeoff

The P-47 is a "blind" airplane.  You must S-turn to see ahead of you.  Use the brakes to steer while taxiing, using about 8-900 RPM maximum to taxi at 5-10 mph.

Make certain the runway is clear, then line up in the center.  Close the canopy, lock the tailwheel, and half-close the cowl flaps.  The apply power smoothly to a maximum of 52" of boost with the propeller control full forward.  The P-47 requires a longer takeoff run than other fighters.  You may be tempted to exceed redline in order to build up speed.  Don't do it!  Your plane gets off the ground OK using prescribed power limits - thousands do every day.  Raise the tail about 6" and stay on the ground until reaching about 110 mph.  Then fly the plane off the runway.  The raised tail and increased speed give you better rudder control in case of trouble.

After Takeoff Check

  1. Landing gear - UP
  2. Flaps -UP
  3. Throttle back to normal climbing power.
  4. Adjust the prop to climbing RPM.
  5. Retrim the ship as required for climbing.
  6. Turn the booster pump to the normal position.
  7. Check over all your instruments.

Climb

Develop climbing speed before starting to climb.  Be easy on the back pressure until you have at least 140 mph, then climb gently.  Then reduce your power to climbing power, 42" boost and 2550 RPM.  The minimum climbing speed is 155-160 mph IAS, best climbing speed is 165 mph IAS, which will drop to 155 mph IAS between 10,000 and 15,000 feet.  Above 15,000 feet, climb at 155 mph IAS.  Adjust cowl flaps as needed to cool the cylinders; closed to 1/3 open is about right for climbing.  Above 3,000 feet, switch to drop tanks if they are available.  Otherwise, climb on the main tank for ten minutes and then switch to the auxiliary (reserve) tank.

Climb performance to 25,000 feet (14,500 lbs.)

Manifold Pressure

RPM

Elapsed Time

Distance 

Fuel Used

42"

2550

15.5 minutes

51 miles

40 gallons

 


Cruise Settings

Plan your flight by knowing how much fuel you will need.  The following charts indicate approximate fuel consumption for a range of weights, altitudes, power settings, and speeds.  The bold figures indicate what would be an auto-rich power setting for the real aircraft (not simulated in FS9) and the italicized figures are for auto-lean power settings.  All mixture control is automatic with this flight model, as with the real aircraft.

Cruise Control Schedule (14,000-15,000 lbs.)

Altitude

Pilot's
IAS

Manifold
Pressure

RPM

TAS MPH

GPH

Specific
Range

6,000

216

31

1700

233

68

3.4 mpg

15,000

235

32

2100

290

97

3.0 mpg

25,000

222

31

2150

323

96

3.3 mpg

25,000

248

38

2500

358

126

2.8 mpg

Cruise Control Schedule (16,000-17,000 lbs.)

Altitude

Pilot's
IAS

Manifold
Pressure

RPM

TAS MPH

GPH

Specific
Range

6,000

205

31

1700

222

68

3.2 mpg

15,000

227

32

2100

280

99

2.8 mpg

25,000

212

31

2150

308

98

3.1 mpg

 


Landing

  1. Check tanks and select the fullest interior tank for landing.
  2. Reduce airspeed to 150-200 mph.
  3. Check the mixture control and set to RICH.
  4. Set the engine to about 2550 RPM and 30" of boost.
  5. Close cowl flaps.
  6. Open canopy.
  7. Check gear is down and locked.
  8. Do not make turns below 150 mph IAS.
  9. Begin lowering flaps about halfway around your turn to final approach.
  10. After your flaps are down and you roll out of the turn onto the landing (approach) leg, your speed should be about 125-135 mph IAS.  Don't keep so much power on that you'll be making a power approach.  However, keep enough power on to keep your engine clean.
  11. Just before getting to the runway, break your glide, make a smooth roundout, and approach the runway in a 3-point attitude.
  12. Hold the plane off in the 3-point attitude just barely above the runway until you lose flying speed and the plane sets down.  The P-47 has no tendency to drop a wing but settles rather quickly when you lose flying speed.  So have your plane close to the runway at this point.

Engine Limitations and Characteristics

The turbosupercharged Pratt & Whitney R-2800-series engines are reliable and potent performers.  They can take a lot of battle damage and still make it home.  The P-47D is fitted with a water-injected R-2800-59W which provides 2,300 HP when the water injection switch is enabled.  Emergency power is not required for takeoff.  The turbocharged engine produces power to very high altitudes.

To activate emergency boost, turn the switch on the electrical panel to "AUTO".  The water injection will come on automatically whenever the throttle is advanced beyond 95 percent.  Leave the switch off for takeoff and normal flying.

ENGINE POWER CHART

TAKEOFF
MAXIMUM

TAKEOFF
NORMAL

WAR
EMERGENCY

MILITARY
POWER

MAXIMUM
CONTINUOUS

MAXIMUM
CRUISE

NORMAL
CRUISE

MP

52"

52"

56"

52"

42"

36"

32"

RPM

2700

2700

2700

2700

2550

2550

2250

Flight Characteristics

The Thunderbolt is a heavy aircraft and flies like it.  This is not an airplane you can toss around; control responses are good but not lightning-quick, so a little more planning ahead is needed than with a lightweight fighter.  This is especially true in slow flight and with takeoffs and landings.  However it is quite stable and predictable.

Stalls

Power-off stalls are fairly mild and there is little tendency to drop a wing unless the stick is horsed backward unnecessarily.  With power on, the left wing will tend to drop.  In either case the recovery is straightforward; apply power, push the stick forward, and use the rudders for directional control until flying speed is regained.  With accelerated stalls the procedure is similar unless the stall develops into a spin.

Spins

Never spin the aircraft intentionally even with power off unless you have sufficient altitude to get out of the spin above 10,000 feet.  Never spin the airplane intentionally with the power on under any conditions.  The P-47 does not tend to spin by itself but needs rudder input from the pilot.  However, in a deep accelerated stall a spin may develop.  Recovery is generally very prompt by putting the nose down and applying opposite rudder.  If this does not work, apply power until the spin breaks.

Permissible Acrobatics

All acrobatics are permissible, with the exception of snap rolls and power-on spins.

 

 

Wings of Power P-47M Thunderbolt

General Information - P-47M

Weights and Loading

This aircraft has been set up with a complete array of station loads, including those for pyrotechnics and oxygen.  The CG shift with differing payloads has been closely duplicated and the shift of weight with fuel consumption also duplicates the real aircraft very closely.  By viewing the fuel and payloads menu, you can select what payloads you wish to carry and which ones you want to delete in order to fly at a specific weight.  You can then save your flight with your payload and fuel choices.  For heavier weights, use 15-20 degrees of flaps for takeoff and allow a longer takeoff run.

Aircraft Limitations

Wings of Power P-47M Thunderbolt Checklist

Cockpit Check - Fuel Supply

The P-47M has an internal fuel capacity of 370 gallons and can carry two 110-gallon drop tanks.  Check the fuel selector switch position and the tank contents and make sure the fuel selector is on MAIN for takeoff.  Climb on the main tank for ten minutes, then switch to the auxiliary tank and exhaust the contents (except for a reasonable reserve) before switching back to the main tank for the remainder of the mission.  If drop tanks are fitted, switch to these after reaching 3,000 feet and exhaust these first, then switch to the auxiliary tank, and finally the main tank.  The auxiliary position selects the 100-gallon rear fuselage tank, and the external tanks position causes fuel to be drawn from either of the two wing tanks, which can be selected individually using the external tank selector.

Engine Management

The engine will "load up" and foul the spark plugs if it is not kept clear.  Keep your engine idling at 8-900 RPM while on the ground to make sure the cylinders are clean to assure enough cooling airflow.  If the engine idles below 600 RPM for more than one minute, it will die and will need to be restarted.

There is a flashing yellow warning light next to the turbine RPM gauge.  It is normal for this light to flash.  If it glows solidly, reduce throttle to avoid turbine overspeed.

Mixture Control

The real aircraft had an automatic mixture control system which could be placed in either Auto-Rich or Auto-Lean for normal operations.  This flight model also uses automatic mixture control, just as the real aircraft did.  However, the rich/lean options for auto-control cannot be duplicated in FS9, so fuel consumption will be lower than the real aircraft at higher power settings.  The use of manual mixture control cannot compensate for this discrepancy; it is not possible to duplicate the high fuel consumption at rich mixture settings that were experienced by the real aircraft.


Cockpit Check - Controls

  1. Parking Brake - Set
  2. Fuel Selector - Set to MAIN.
  3. Elevator Trim - Neutral
  4. Rudder Trim - 5 degrees nose-right
  5. Aileron Trim - Neutral
  6. Flaps - Up for takeoff (15-20 degrees down for weights over 15,000 lbs.)
  7. Cowl flaps - OPEN FULL
  8. Carburetor Air - Normal
  9. Propeller Control - FULL FORWARD
  10. Tailwheel - unlocked for taxi
  11. Flight Instruments - Checked and Set
  12. Engine Instruments - Checked
  13. Switches - Checked

Engine Starting

  1. Cockpit Check - COMPLETE
  2. Set or hold your parking brakes.
  3. Turn the battery and generator switches to ON.
  4. Put fuel selector on MAIN.
  5. Put the booster pump on EMERGENCY.
  6. Turn the magneto switch on BOTH.
  7. Set mixture control to RICH.
  8. Confirm fuel pressure is at least 10 psi.
  9. Use the primer - three to four shots for a cold engine.
  10. Engage starter switch until the engine starts.
  11. Check engine instruments to confirm oil pressure rises to at least 50 psi within 30 seconds.
  12. Idle at 800-1000 RPM until the oil temperature reaches 40 degrees C. (About three minutes)
  13. Check the suction gage to see if it is working.
  14. Check all instruments for proper function.
  15. After warm-up, idle at 1000 RPM or slightly less.
  16. Idling at less than 600 RPM will cause the engine to load up and it will die after about a minute.

Pre-takeoff Check

  1. See that the trim tabs are properly set.
  2. Check the mags at 2300 RPM.  100 RPM drop maximum.
  3. Check the propeller control.
  4. Turn the booster pump to emergency.
  5. Check ammeter and radios.
  6. Check brakes.

Taxi and Takeoff

The P-47 is a "blind" airplane.  You must S-turn to see ahead of you.  Use the brakes to steer while taxiing, using about 8-900 RPM maximum to taxi at 5-10 mph.

Make certain the runway is clear, then line up in the center.  Close the canopy, lock the tailwheel, and half-close the cowl flaps.  The apply power smoothly to a maximum of 54" of boost with the propeller control full forward.  The P-47 requires a longer takeoff run than other fighters.  You may be tempted to exceed redline in order to build up speed.  Don't do it!  Your plane gets off the ground OK using prescribed power limits - thousands do every day.  Raise the tail about 6" and stay on the ground until reaching about 110 mph.  Then fly the plane off the runway.  The raised tail and increased speed give you better rudder control in case of trouble.

After Takeoff Check

  1. Landing gear - UP
  2. Flaps -UP
  3. Throttle back to normal climbing power.
  4. Adjust the prop to climbing RPM.
  5. Retrim the ship as required for climbing.
  6. Turn the booster pump to the normal position.
  7. Check over all your instruments.

Climb

Develop climbing speed before starting to climb.  Be easy on the back pressure until you have at least 140 mph, then climb gently.  Then reduce your power to climbing power, 43" boost and 2600 RPM.  The minimum climbing speed is 155-160 mph IAS, best climbing speed is 165 mph IAS, which will drop to 155 mph IAS between 10,000 and 15,000 feet.  Above 15,000 feet, climb at 155 mph IAS.  Adjust cowl flaps as needed to cool the cylinders; closed to 1/3 open is about right for climbing.  Above 3,000 feet, switch to drop tanks if they are available.  Otherwise, climb on the main tank for ten minutes and then switch to the auxiliary (reserve) tank.

Climb performance to 32,000 feet (14,500 lbs.)

Manifold Pressure

RPM

Elapsed Time

Distance 

Fuel Used

43"

2600

15.5 minutes

52 miles

50 gallons

Cruise Settings

Plan your flight by knowing how much fuel you will need.  The following charts indicate approximate fuel consumption for a range of weights, altitudes, power settings, and speeds.  The bold figures indicate what would be an auto-rich power setting for the real aircraft (not simulated in FS9) and the italicized figures are for auto-lean power settings.  All mixture control is automatic with this flight model, as with the real aircraft.

Cruise Control Schedule (14,000-15,000 lbs.)

Altitude

Pilot's
IAS

Manifold
Pressure

RPM

TAS MPH

GPH

Specific
Range

6,000

216

31

1700

233

68

3.4 mpg

15,000

235

32

2100

290

97

3.0 mpg

25,000

222

31

2150

323

96

3.3 mpg

25,000

248

38

2500

358

126

2.8 mpg

 


Cruise Control Schedule (16,000-17,000 lbs.)

Altitude

Pilot's
IAS

Manifold
Pressure

RPM

TAS MPH

GPH

Specific
Range

6,000

205

31

1700

222

68

3.2 mpg

15,000

227

32

2100

280

99

2.8 mpg

25,000

212

31

2150

308

98

3.1 mpg

Landing

  1. Check tanks and select the fullest interior tank for landing.
  2. Reduce airspeed to 160-200 mph.
  3. Check the mixture control and set to RICH.
  4. Set the engine to about 2550 RPM and 30" of boost.
  5. Close cowl flaps.
  6. Open canopy.
  7. Check gear is down and locked.
  8. Do not make turns below 160 mph IAS.
  9. Begin lowering flaps about halfway around your turn to final approach.
  10. After your flaps are down and you roll out of the turn onto the landing (approach) leg, your speed should be about 135-145 mph IAS.  Don't keep so much power on that you'll be making a power approach.  However, keep enough power on to keep your engine clean.
  11. Just before getting to the runway, break your glide, make a smooth roundout, and approach the runway in a 3-point attitude.
  12. Hold the plane off in the 3-point attitude just barely above the runway until you lose flying speed and the plane sets down.  The P-47 has no tendency to drop a wing but settles rather quickly when you lose flying speed.  So have your plane close to the runway at this point.

Engine Limitations and Characteristics

The turbosupercharged Pratt & Whitney R-2800-series engines are reliable and potent performers.  They can take a lot of battle damage and still make it home.  The P-47N is fitted with a water-injected R-2800-57W which provides 2,800 HP when the water injection switch is enabled.  Emergency power is not required for takeoff.  The turbocharged engine produces power to very high altitudes.

To activate emergency boost, turn the switch on the electrical panel to "AUTO".  The water injection will come on automatically whenever the throttle is advanced beyond 95 percent.  Leave the switch off for takeoff and normal flying.

ENGINE POWER CHART

TAKEOFF
MAXIMUM

TAKEOFF
NORMAL

WAR
EMERGENCY

MILITARY
POWER

MAXIMUM
CONTINUOUS

MAXIMUM
CRUISE

NORMAL
CRUISE

MP

54"

54"

64"

54"

43"

38"

32"

RPM

2800

2800

2800

2800

2600

2600

2250

Flight Characteristics

The Thunderbolt is a heavy aircraft and flies like it.  This is not an airplane you can toss around; control responses are good but not lightning-quick, so a little more planning ahead is needed than with a lightweight fighter.  This is especially true in slow flight and with takeoffs and landings.  However it is quite stable and predictable.

Stalls

Power-off stalls are fairly mild and there is little tendency to drop a wing unless the stick is horsed backward unnecessarily.  With power on, the left wing will tend to drop.  In either case the recovery is straightforward; apply power, push the stick forward, and use the rudders for directional control until flying speed is regained.  With accelerated stalls the procedure is similar unless the stall develops into a spin.

Spins

Never spin the aircraft intentionally even with power off unless you have sufficient altitude to get out of the spin above 10,000 feet.  Never spin the airplane intentionally with the power on under any conditions.  The P-47 does not tend to spin by itself but needs rudder input from the pilot.  However, in a deep accelerated stall a spin may develop.  Recovery is generally very prompt by putting the nose down and applying opposite rudder.  If this does not work, apply power until the spin breaks.

Permissible Acrobatics

All acrobatics are permissible, with the exception of snap rolls and power-on spins.

 

 

Wings of Power P-47N Thunderbolt

The P-47N was a long-range version made for use in the Pacific Theatre.  It had a much larger fuel capacity, a larger wing, and could carry large drop tanks of up to 300 gallons.  It also had a faster rate of roll due to increased aileron area and "clipped" wings.  It used the same 2,800 HP engine as the P-47M but had a slightly lower top speed because of its heavier weight.

General Information - P-47N

Weights and Loading

This aircraft has been set up with a complete array of station loads, including those for pyrotechnics and oxygen.  The CG shift with differing payloads has been closely duplicated and the shift of weight with fuel consumption also duplicates the real aircraft very closely.  By viewing the fuel and payloads menu, you can select what payloads you wish to carry and which ones you want to delete in order to fly at a specific weight.  You can then save your flight with your payload and fuel choices.  For heavier weights, use 15-20 degrees of flaps for takeoff and allow a longer takeoff run.

Aircraft Limitations

Wings of Power P-47N Thunderbolt Checklist

Cockpit Check - Fuel Supply

Check the fuel selector switch position and the tank contents and make sure the fuel selector is on MAIN for takeoff.  Climb on the main tank for ten minutes, then switch to the auxiliary tank and exhaust the contents (except for a reasonable reserve) before switching back to the main tank for the remainder of the mission.  If drop tanks are fitted, switch to these after reaching 3,000 feet and exhaust these first, then switch to the auxiliary tank, and finally the main tank.  The P-47N has a fuel capacity of 556 gallons total in two fuselage tanks and can carry two 165-gallon drop tanks.  On the fuel selector pop-up, select MAIN for takeoff.  The auxiliary position selects the 100-gallon rear fuselage tank, and the external tanks position causes fuel to be drawn from either of the two wing tanks, which can be selected individually using the external tank selector.

Engine Management

The engine will "load up" and foul the spark plugs if it is not kept clear.  Keep your engine idling at 8-900 RPM while on the ground to make sure the cylinders are clean to assure enough cooling airflow.  If the engine idles below 600 RPM for more than one minute, it will die and will need to be restarted.

There is a flashing yellow warning light next to the turbine RPM gauge.  It is normal for this light to flash.  If it glows solidly, reduce throttle to avoid turbine overspeed.

Mixture Control

The real aircraft had an automatic mixture control system which could be placed in either Auto-Rich or Auto-Lean for normal operations.  This flight model also uses automatic mixture control, just as the real aircraft did.  However, the rich/lean options for auto-control cannot be duplicated in FS9, so fuel consumption will be lower than the real aircraft at higher power settings.  The use of manual mixture control cannot compensate for this discrepancy; it is not possible to duplicate the high fuel consumption at rich mixture settings that were experienced by the real aircraft.


Cockpit Check - Controls

  1. Parking Brake - Set
  2. Fuel Selector - Set to MAIN.
  3. Elevator Trim - Neutral
  4. Rudder Trim - 5 degrees nose-right
  5. Aileron Trim - Neutral
  6. Flaps - Up for takeoff (15-20 degrees down for weights over 15,000 lbs.)
  7. Cowl flaps - OPEN FULL
  8. Carburetor Air - Normal
  9. Propeller Control - FULL FORWARD
  10. Tailwheel - unlocked for taxi
  11. Flight Instruments - Checked and Set
  12. Engine Instruments - Checked
  13. Switches - Checked

Engine Starting

  1. Cockpit Check - COMPLETE
  2. Set or hold your parking brakes.
  3. Turn the battery and generator switches to ON.
  4. Put fuel selector on MAIN.
  5. Put the booster pump on EMERGENCY.
  6. Turn the magneto switch on BOTH.
  7. Set mixture control to RICH.
  8. Confirm fuel pressure is at least 10 psi.
  9. Use the primer - three to four shots for a cold engine.
  10. Engage starter switch until the engine starts.
  11. Check engine instruments to confirm oil pressure rises to at least 50 psi within 30 seconds.
  12. Idle at 800-1000 RPM until the oil temperature reaches 40 degrees C. (About three minutes)
  13. Check the suction gage to see if it is working.
  14. Check all instruments for proper function.
  15. After warm-up, idle at 1000 RPM or slightly less.
  16. Idling at less than 600 RPM will cause the engine to load up and it will die after about a minute.

Pre-takeoff Check

  1. See that the trim tabs are properly set.
  2. Check the mags at 2300 RPM.  100 RPM drop maximum.
  3. Check the propeller control.
  4. Turn the booster pump to emergency.
  5. Check ammeter and radios.
  6. Check brakes.

Taxi and Takeoff

The P-47 is a "blind" airplane.  You must S-turn to see ahead of you.  Use the brakes to steer while taxiing, using about 8-900 RPM maximum to taxi at 5-10 mph.

Make certain the runway is clear, then line up in the center.  Close the canopy, lock the tailwheel, and half-close the cowl flaps.  The apply power smoothly to a maximum of 54" of boost with the propeller control full forward.  The P-47 requires a longer takeoff run than other fighters.  You may be tempted to exceed redline in order to build up speed.  Don't do it!  Your plane gets off the ground OK using prescribed power limits - thousands do every day.  Raise the tail about 6" and stay on the ground until reaching about 120 mph.  Then fly the plane off the runway.  The raised tail and increased speed give you better rudder control in case of trouble.

After Takeoff Check

  1. Landing gear - UP
  2. Flaps -UP
  3. Throttle back to normal climbing power.
  4. Adjust the prop to climbing RPM.
  5. Retrim the ship as required for climbing.
  6. Turn the booster pump to the normal position.
  7. Check over all your instruments.

Climb

Develop climbing speed before starting to climb.  Be easy on the back pressure until you have at least 140 mph, then climb gently.  Then reduce your power to climbing power, 43" boost and 2600 RPM.  The minimum climbing speed is 155-160 mph IAS, best climbing speed is 165 mph IAS, which will drop to 155 mph IAS between 10,000 and 15,000 feet.  Above 15,000 feet, climb at 155 mph IAS.  Adjust cowl flaps as needed to cool the cylinders; closed to 1/3 open is about right for climbing.  Above 3,000 feet, switch to drop tanks if they are available.  Otherwise, climb on the main tank for ten minutes and then switch to the auxiliary (reserve) tank.

Climb performance to 25,000 feet (16,700 lbs.)

Manifold Pressure

RPM

Elapsed Time

Distance 

Fuel Used

43"

2600

19.5 minutes

59 miles

48 gallons

Cruise Settings

Plan your flight by knowing how much fuel you will need.  The following charts indicate approximate fuel consumption for a range of weights, altitudes, power settings, and speeds.  The bold figures indicate what would be an auto-rich power setting for the real aircraft (not simulated in FS9) and the italicized figures are for auto-lean power settings.  All mixture control is automatic with this flight model, as with the real aircraft.

Cruise Control Schedule (14,000-15,000 lbs.)

Altitude

Pilot's
IAS

Manifold
Pressure

RPM

TAS MPH

GPH

Specific
Range

6,000

216

31

1700

233

68

3.4 mpg

15,000

235

32

2100

290

97

3.0 mpg

25,000

222

31

2150

323

96

3.3 mpg

25,000

248

38

2500

358

126

2.8 mpg

 


Cruise Control Schedule (16,000-17,000 lbs.)

Altitude

Pilot's
IAS

Manifold
Pressure

RPM

TAS MPH

GPH

Specific
Range

6,000

205

31

1700

222

68

3.2 mpg

15,000

227

32

2100

280

99

2.8 mpg

25,000

212

31

2150

308

98

3.1 mpg

Landing

  1. Check tanks and select the fullest interior tank for landing.
  2. Reduce airspeed to 160-200 mph.
  3. Check the mixture control and set to RICH.
  4. Set the engine to about 2550 RPM and 30" of boost.
  5. Close cowl flaps.
  6. Open canopy.
  7. Check gear is down and locked.
  8. Do not make turns below 160 mph IAS.
  9. Begin lowering flaps about halfway around your turn to final approach.
  10. After your flaps are down and you roll out of the turn onto the landing (approach) leg, your speed should be about 135-145 mph IAS.  Don't keep so much power on that you'll be making a power approach.  However, keep enough power on to keep your engine clean.
  11. Just before getting to the runway, break your glide, make a smooth roundout, and approach the runway in a 3-point attitude.
  12. Hold the plane off in the 3-point attitude just barely above the runway until you lose flying speed and the plane sets down.  The P-47 has no tendency to drop a wing but settles rather quickly when you lose flying speed.  So have your plane close to the runway at this point.

Engine Limitations and Characteristics

The turbosupercharged Pratt & Whitney R-2800-series engines are reliable and potent performers.  They can take a lot of battle damage and still make it home.  The P-47N is fitted with a water-injected R-2800-57W which provides 2,800 HP when the water injection switch is enabled.  Emergency power is not required for takeoff.  The turbocharged engine produces power to very high altitudes.

To activate emergency boost, turn the switch on the electrical panel to "AUTO".  The water injection will come on automatically whenever the throttle is advanced beyond 95 percent.  Leave the switch off for takeoff and normal flying.

ENGINE POWER CHART

TAKEOFF
MAXIMUM

TAKEOFF
NORMAL

WAR
EMERGENCY

MILITARY
POWER

MAXIMUM
CONTINUOUS

MAXIMUM
CRUISE

NORMAL
CRUISE

MP

54"

54"

64"

54"

43"

38"

32"

RPM

2800

2800

2800

2800

2600

2600

2250

Flight Characteristics

The Thunderbolt is a heavy aircraft and flies like it.  This is not an airplane you can toss around; control responses are good but not lightning-quick, so a little more planning ahead is needed than with a lightweight fighter.  This is especially true in slow flight and with takeoffs and landings.  However it is quite stable and predictable.

Stalls

Power-off stalls are fairly mild and there is little tendency to drop a wing unless the stick is horsed backward unnecessarily.  With power on, the left wing will tend to drop.  In either case the recovery is straightforward; apply power, push the stick forward, and use the rudders for directional control until flying speed is regained.  With accelerated stalls the procedure is similar unless the stall develops into a spin.

Spins

Never spin the aircraft intentionally even with power off unless you have sufficient altitude to get out of the spin above 10,000 feet.  Never spin the airplane intentionally with the power on under any conditions.  The P-47 does not tend to spin by itself but needs rudder input from the pilot.  However, in a deep accelerated stall a spin may develop.  Recovery is generally very prompt by putting the nose down and applying opposite rudder.  If this does not work, apply power until the spin breaks.

Permissible Acrobatics

All acrobatics are permissible, with the exception of snap rolls and power-on spins.

 

 

Wings of Power XP-72 Ultrabolt

The XP-72 Ultrabolt was to have been the ultimate P-47.  Equipped with a massively powerful Pratt & Whitney R-4360 engine producing 3,400 HP for combat emergency, this plane could climb over 5,000 fpm and would have reached a top speed of over 500 mph.  It was fitted with a low-drag NACA engine cowling and was fairly light in weight.  The type never saw combat.  Only two were built, one with a four-bladed conventional propeller and the other with twin, contra-rotating, three blade airscrews.  The first was lost in a crash and the second was scrapped around the time of VJ-Day.

General Information - XP- 72 Ultrabolt

Weights and Loading

This aircraft has been set up with a complete array of station loads, including those for pyrotechnics and oxygen.  The CG shift with differing payloads has been closely duplicated and the shift of weight with fuel consumption also duplicates the real aircraft very closely.  By viewing the fuel and payloads menu, you can select what payloads you wish to carry and which ones you want to delete in order to fly at a specific weight.  You can then save your flight with your payload and fuel choices.  For heavier weights, use 15-20 degrees of flaps for takeoff and allow a longer takeoff run.

Aircraft Limitations

Wings of Power XP-72 Ultrabolt Checklist

Cockpit Check - Fuel Supply

The Ultrabolt has a fuel capacity of 370 gallons total in two fuselage tanks and can carry two 110-gallon drop tanks.  Check the fuel selector switch position and the tank contents and make sure the fuel selector is on MAIN for takeoff.  Climb on the main tank for ten minutes, then switch to the auxiliary tank and exhaust the contents (except for a reasonable reserve) before switching back to the main tank for the remainder of the mission.  If drop tanks are fitted, switch to these after reaching 3,000 feet and exhaust these first, then switch to the auxiliary tank, and finally the main tank.  The auxiliary position selects the 100-gallon rear fuselage tank, and the external tanks position causes fuel to be drawn from either of the two wing tanks, which can be selected individually using the external tank selector.

Engine Management

The engine will "load up" and foul the spark plugs if it is not kept clear.  Keep your engine idling at 8-900 RPM while on the ground to make sure the cylinders are clean to assure enough cooling airflow.  If the engine idles below 600 RPM for more than one minute, it will die and will need to be restarted.

There is a flashing yellow warning light next to the turbine RPM gauge.  It is normal for this light to flash.  If it glows solidly, reduce throttle to avoid turbine overspeed.

Mixture Control

The real aircraft had an automatic mixture control system which could be placed in either Auto-Rich or Auto-Lean for normal operations.  This flight model also uses automatic mixture control, just as the real aircraft did.  However, the rich/lean options for auto-control cannot be duplicated in FS9, so fuel consumption will be lower than the real aircraft at higher power settings.  The use of manual mixture control cannot compensate for this discrepancy; it is not possible to duplicate the high fuel consumption at rich mixture settings that were experienced by the real aircraft.


Cockpit Check - Controls

  1. Parking Brake - Set
  2. Fuel Selector - Set to MAIN.
  3. Elevator Trim - Neutral
  4. Rudder Trim - Neutral
  5. Aileron Trim - Neutral
  6. Flaps - Up for takeoff (15-20 degrees down for weights over 15,000 lbs.)
  7. Cowl flaps - OPEN FULL
  8. Carburetor Air - Normal
  9. Propeller Control - FULL FORWARD
  10. Tailwheel - unlocked for taxi
  11. Flight Instruments - Checked and Set
  12. Engine Instruments - Checked
  13. Switches - Checked

Engine Starting

  1. Cockpit Check - COMPLETE
  2. Set or hold your parking brakes.
  3. Turn the battery and generator switches to ON.
  4. Put fuel selector on MAIN.
  5. Put the booster pump on EMERGENCY.
  6. Turn the magneto switch on BOTH.
  7. Set mixture control to RICH.
  8. Confirm fuel pressure is at least 10 psi.
  9. Use the primer - three to four shots for a cold engine.
  10. Engage starter switch until the engine starts.
  11. Check engine instruments to confirm oil pressure rises to at least 50 psi within 30 seconds.
  12. Idle at 800-1000 RPM until the oil temperature reaches 40 degrees C. (About three minutes)
  13. Check the suction gage to see if it is working.
  14. Check all instruments for proper function.
  15. After warm-up, idle at 1000 RPM or slightly less.
  16. Idling at less than 600 RPM will cause the engine to load up and it will die after about a minute.

Pre-takeoff Check

  1. See that the trim tabs are properly set.
  2. Check the mags at 2300 RPM.  100 RPM drop maximum.
  3. Check the propeller control.
  4. Turn the booster pump to emergency.
  5. Check ammeter and radios.
  6. Check brakes.

Taxi and Takeoff

The Ultrabolt is a "blind" airplane.  You must S-turn to see ahead of you.  Use the brakes to steer while taxiing, using about 8-900 RPM maximum to taxi at 5-10 mph.

Make certain the runway is clear, then line up in the center.  Close the canopy, lock the tailwheel, and half-close the cowl flaps.  The apply power smoothly to a maximum of 56" of boost with the propeller control full forward.  Raise the tail about 6" and stay on the ground until reaching about 120 mph.  Then fly the plane off the runway.  The raised tail and increased speed give you better rudder control in case of trouble.

After Takeoff Check

  1. Landing gear - UP
  2. Flaps -UP
  3. Throttle back to normal climbing power.
  4. Adjust the prop to climbing RPM.
  5. Retrim the ship as required for climbing.
  6. Turn the booster pump to the normal position.
  7. Check over all your instruments.

Climb

Develop climbing speed before starting to climb.  Be easy on the back pressure until you have at least 140 mph, then climb gently.  Then reduce your power to climbing power, 42" boost and 2550 RPM.  The minimum climbing speed is 155-160 mph IAS, best climbing speed is 165 mph IAS, which will drop to 155 mph IAS between 10,000 and 15,000 feet.  Above 15,000 feet, climb at 155 mph IAS.  Adjust cowl flaps as needed to cool the cylinders; closed to 1/3 open is about right for climbing.  Above 3,000 feet, switch to drop tanks if they are available.  Otherwise, climb on the main tank for ten minutes and then switch to the auxiliary (reserve) tank.

Climb performance to 30,000 feet (16,000 lbs., MIL power)

Manifold Pressure

RPM

Elapsed Time

Distance 

Fuel Used

56"

2700

8 minutes

26 miles

47 gallons

Cruise Settings

Plan your flight by knowing how much fuel you will need.  The following charts indicate approximate fuel consumption for a range of weights, altitudes, power settings, and speeds.  The bold figures are for auto-rich power settings (not available in FS9) and the italicized figures are for auto-lean power settings (standard with this aircraft).

Cruise Control Schedule (14,000-15,000 lbs.)

Altitude

Pilot's
IAS

Manifold
Pressure

RPM

TAS MPH

GPH

Specific
Range

6,000

225

28

1600

243

68

3.5 mpg

15,000

248

32

2100

306

100

3.1 mpg

25,000

208

28

1600

303

73

4.1 mpg

 


Landing

  1. Check tanks and select the fullest interior tank for landing.
  2. Reduce airspeed to 150-200 mph.
  3. Check the mixture control and set to RICH.
  4. Set the engine to about 2550 RPM and 30" of boost.
  5. Close cowl flaps.
  6. Open canopy.
  7. Check gear is down and locked.
  8. Do not make turns below 150 mph IAS.
  9. Begin lowering flaps about halfway around your turn to final approach.
  10. After your flaps are down and you roll out of the turn onto the landing (approach) leg, your speed should be about 125-135 mph IAS.  Don't keep so much power on that you'll be making a power approach.  However, keep enough power on to keep your engine clean.
  11. Just before getting to the runway, break your glide, make a smooth roundout, and approach the runway in a 3-point attitude.
  12. Hold the plane off in the 3-point attitude just barely above the runway until you lose flying speed and the plane sets down.  The aircraft has no tendency to drop a wing but settles rather quickly when you lose flying speed.  So have your plane close to the runway at this point.

Engine Limitations and Characteristics

The Pratt & Whitney R-4360 is one of the world's mightiest aero-engines.  In such a light plane as the XP-72, power is never a problem.  There is always plenty of thrust when you need it.

To activate emergency boost, turn the switch on the electrical panel to "AUTO".  The water injection will come on automatically whenever the throttle is advanced beyond 95 percent.  Leave the switch off for takeoff and normal flying.

ENGINE POWER CHART

TAKEOFF
MAXIMUM

TAKEOFF
NORMAL

WAR
EMERGENCY

MILITARY
POWER

MAXIMUM
CONTINUOUS

MAXIMUM
CRUISE

NORMAL
CRUISE

MP

56"

56"

61"

56"

42"

36"

32"

RPM

2700

2700

2700

2700

2550

2550

2250

 

Flight Characteristics

The Thunderbolt is a heavy aircraft and flies like it.  This is not an airplane you can toss around; control responses are good but not lightning-quick, so a little more planning ahead is needed than with a lightweight fighter.  This is especially true in slow flight and with takeoffs and landings.  However it is quite stable and predictable.

Stalls

Power-off stalls are fairly mild and there is little tendency to drop a wing unless the stick is horsed backward unnecessarily.  With power on, the left wing will tend to drop.  In either case the recovery is straightforward; apply power, push the stick forward, and use the rudders for directional control until flying speed is regained.  With accelerated stalls the procedure is similar unless the stall develops into a spin.

Spins

Never spin the aircraft intentionally even with power off unless you have sufficient altitude to get out of the spin above 10,000 feet.  Never spin the airplane intentionally with the power on under any conditions.  The aircraft does not tend to spin by itself but needs rudder input from the pilot.  However, in a deep accelerated stall a spin may develop.  Recovery is generally very prompt by putting the nose down and applying opposite rudder.  If this does not work, apply power until the spin breaks.

Permissible Acrobatics

All acrobatics are permissible, with the exception of snap rolls and power-on spins.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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