Aerobatics with the P-51 Mustang

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martinB
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Aerobatics with the P-51 Mustang

Post martinB »

Hello friends out there!
I often surf on YouTube to find clips with aerobatics by A2A's P-51 Mustang but there's not much to find. So I decided to make a clip by myself with a little aerobatics and upload to YouTube. I know it's not perfect yet and needs a little more practise.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VCGAGyEhAZ8

One figure I also want to fly is the hammerhead but could not get it yet. Is this figure even possible with the Mustang or is the rudder surface to small? May be someone can explaine how to do it?

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alehead
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Re: Aerobatics with the P-51 Mustang

Post alehead »

You're right, there is not too much on YT showcasing this great aircraft by A2A. Nice to see someone going for it...

You might want to lower you manifold pressure and bring the prop RPM back to safer levels a little sooner though :)

A blown Merlin is not good, both for the psyche or the wallet!

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martinB
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Re: Aerobatics with the P-51 Mustang

Post martinB »

Hi alehead,

thanks for your reply. Will try flying a loop with reduced power.
Last edited by martinB on 21 Aug 2019, 11:50, edited 1 time in total.

HE11DUDE04
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Re: Aerobatics with the P-51 Mustang

Post HE11DUDE04 »

martinB wrote:
21 Aug 2019, 10:59
Hi alehead,

thanks for your reply. But do you think it's OK to power up when going to loop? With reduced MP and RPM it is difficult to get enough speed for a loop.
I'd recommend keeping 46" manifold and 2700rpm and then power up when entering a loop but at the top of it u might wanna pull it back as the gyro torque will knock u off centre.
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martinB
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Re: Aerobatics with the P-51 Mustang

Post martinB »

I just took a flight with 45 MP and 2700 RPM and it works well if I push the nose downwards a little to take up speed. About 350 MPH seems to be enough. Thank you for your commend. Do you know how to fly a hammerhead with the P-51? The tail do not turn around while pushing the rudder at the top.

HE11DUDE04
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Re: Aerobatics with the P-51 Mustang

Post HE11DUDE04 »

martinB wrote:
21 Aug 2019, 11:56
I just took a flight with 45 MP and 2700 RPM and it works well if I push the nose downwards a little to take up speed. About 350 MPH seems to be enough. Thank you for your commend. Do you know how to fly a hammerhead with the P-51? The tail do not turn around while pushing the rudder at the top.
I think I tried a hammerhead before and I'm pretty sure I used the gyro torque to assist so basically at the top use left rudder and add some power briefly hopefully that will help.
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martinB
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Re: Aerobatics with the P-51 Mustang

Post martinB »

Thank you, I'll try it tomorrow :).

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MkIV Hvd
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Re: Aerobatics with the P-51 Mustang

Post MkIV Hvd »

You will also find that if you reduce your fuel load a bit for a local aerobatic trip like that, it will help you out in the vertical maneuvers. Dudley recommended no more than half tanks, so 45 gallons per side-ish.
Rob Wilkinson
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DHenriquesA2A
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Re: Aerobatics with the P-51 Mustang

Post DHenriquesA2A »

martinB wrote:
21 Aug 2019, 03:54
Hello friends out there!
I often surf on YouTube to find clips with aerobatics by A2A's P-51 Mustang but there's not much to find. So I decided to make a clip by myself with a little aerobatics and upload to YouTube. I know it's not perfect yet and needs a little more practise.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VCGAGyEhAZ8

One figure I also want to fly is the hammerhead but could not get it yet. Is this figure even possible with the Mustang or is the rudder surface to small? May be someone can explaine how to do it?
A pure Hammerhead can be quite difficult to perform in the Mustang. The reason for this is that as you reach the apex of the vertical line the torque from that 11'+ prop up front coupled with the power you are carrying up the line will pull you into a left roll on your X axis.
You will run out of rudder trying to maintain the line. The usual result is a "roll off" into an off the line barrel roll or a split S depending on how you follow through on the controls.
It can be done but it requires some VERY subtle use of throttle at the top of the line and some VERY timely use of the controls that involve full opposite aileron (Only to the left. I wouldn't even try the right side :-)) and full inside rudder with the power back to idle.
All this has to come together at exactly the right instant if you have any hope at all of doing a pure hammerhead. Timing is critical!
If it makes you feel any better :-))))), I never attempted doing a Hammerhead in any of my display routines in a Mustang. It's just not a "normal" P51 maneuver.......stall turn off an oblique climb is ok, but that pure vertical line with power can be a royal PIA if you follow my drift. :-)
Dudley Henriques

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martinB
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Re: Aerobatics with the P-51 Mustang

Post martinB »

@Rob: Thank you for this tipp. May be it would be even better to have more fuel in the left tank for a left hammerhead?

@Dudlay: Thank you for the detailed comment. You are right with the result when trying to make the hammerhead. It allways results in uncontrolled rolling at the top and sometimes in a spin. I saw a video of flying a hammerhead with an Extra 300: First left rudder, than stick a little forward and also ailerons to the right and at least right rudder. But an Extra 300 is no P-51 Mustang :? How ever ... I will try further but only with enough room below me :D . I will report my results 8)

pjc747
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Re: Aerobatics with the P-51 Mustang

Post pjc747 »

Establish a vertical up-line on the zero-lift axis, as you reach 0 airspeed and 0G concurrently, kick full left rudder, right aileron, and perhaps a little push. Establish zero-lift on the vertical down line. Dudley explained its feasibility in the Mustang, at least this is the procedure for a hammerhead.

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Re: Aerobatics with the P-51 Mustang

Post Killratio »

Actually Peter, you want 1G, not zero. If you are at zero G you are already in a tailslide... not a nice place to be!
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pjc747
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Re: Aerobatics with the P-51 Mustang

Post pjc747 »

As you fly vertical, your airspeed and your G will both bleed off. An indication of the zero-lift axis is that they are synced in a way. I didn't say you were at 0, but as you reach it due to decay in energy, then you proceed as described.

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AKar
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Re: Aerobatics with the P-51 Mustang

Post AKar »

Recall, that what is meant by 'g' in airplane context refers usually to the acceleration along airplane's vertical axis. That is, "up" relative to the way you sit in the airplane (even if it points completely elsewhere than "up" in relation to the Earth). This is also what is measured by in-cockpit accelerometer.

Hence, if you climb an airplane vertically in a straight line, this 'g' would be zero, otherwise your flight path would curve over the top of the airplane with positive g, or "over the nose" if g was negative.

If the longitudinal acceleration (acceleration that is towards front or back) was added to the picture, having 1 g of that would effectively mean that your thrust-to-weight ratio was exactly 1:1. Having zero of longitudinal acceleration would mean going straight & level at steady speed, or going straight up but loosing speed to the gravity (for instance, when climbing straight up in a glider, or with power at idle, neglecting the drag here). Or any combination from between.

-Esa

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martinB
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Re: Aerobatics with the P-51 Mustang

Post martinB »

After many unsuccessful attempts to fly the Hammerhead, I have now found a way that has led to success.
I did not fly the upward part exactly vertically, but tilted very slightly forward. Then I reduced the speed to 100 MPH at 1500 RPM and then full rudder left. During the turning then full right aileron with slightly stick forward. This is really important, as otherwise the Hammerhead ends to a quarter of a roll while going downwards. Then early enough rudder right to avoid overshooting. You can see the result here: https://youtu.be/vEbkPqv6ESI. Thank you for the wide range of assistance :D .

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